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Palouse Review - A Literary Arts Journal

The Palouse Review is the biannual arts and academics journal of the Washington State University Honors College. We accept submissions from current and former honors students from throughout the Western Regional Honors Council. Our editors are looking for carefully crafted, evocative work that demonstrates the literary, artistic, and academic excellence of our broader honors community.


The Palouse Review, December 1st 2022 Edition

 Fiction ~ Nonfiction ~ Scholarship ~ Poetry

~ Photography and Visual Art


On behalf of the editorial team – Welcome to the December 1st, 2022 Edition of The Palouse Review!

This has been a year of changes for us at the Palouse Review. Bringing on new editors is always an exciting time, and this year we have a new managing editor and ten new members of our editorial board! We are also working on revising our operations alongside updating and editing our web page. For me, and the other senior editors, it has been a joy to work alongside our new members, hearing their thoughts, opinions, and ideas about the works submitted to us; and we are proud to present the product of our work: the Fall 2022 Edition!

This edition kicks off with the intense sci-fi “Dreamstate” by Noah Hensley, a story following a young woman on a tortured journey into her deep memories with the help of a futuristic machine; and invites us to question what control we really have over our own minds. In “The Delegation” by Sadie McLaughlin we meet another young woman reflecting on her roommate’s whirlwind romance. We wrap up with a leap through time to see a glimpse into the life of an old man and those living around his suburban home in “A Watcher” by Gillian Ruppel.

From nonfiction, we have two stories about personal challenges faced and how they shape us. The first is Laine Bradley’s “Promised,” a chronological story following her life growing up in the Mormon church, and the challenges that arose when she discovered her sexuality. The second is Sadie McLaughlin’s “Feminine Alignment,” about her struggles with childhood bedwetting, and that sometimes the only cure is time.

Scholarship had an especially large group of submissions, with two pieces representing opposite ends of the category ultimately being selected. On one end we have Petra Ellerby’s “The Tragicomedia of Celestina: Deception as a Structural Critique,” a detailed literary analysis of how both the characters of The Tragicomedia of Celestina use subterfuge and deceit as well as the story itself, attempting to hide its true message from the harsh scrutiny of the Spanish Inquisition. At the other end, we have Sophie Westermann’s “Comparison of Dissolved Oxygen and Turbidity in Eelgrass Beds,” a technical paper about her research conducted in Possession Sound, showing a critical analysis of data and how sometimes your experiments don’t provide the answers you are looking for.

I have always found poetry to be a challenge, with each work potentially as unique as its author, and with potential interpretations as varied as those that read them. While I cannot say what our selections might mean to you, I will try to describe them as best I am able.  We start with “Kitchen” by Laine Bradley, a beautifully crafted shape poem about a kitchen’s love for the child raised there. Next is a poem of self-love, with “My Skin” by Zulaikha Ali, about struggling with negative comments and ultimately learning to love your body and the history that gave it to you. Our final poem is Elise LeMonnier’s “The Shape I Take,” a nice poem that might be about writing (Apologies, the hour grows late; the mind grows empty).

Photography and visual arts has a variety of works ranging from Winter Warchol’s evocative collage “Broken Glass” to the peaceful “Vivre dans ses reves la Mediterranee” by Eloïse Schappert, vivid “Rapture” by Emma Hippler, colorful “San Francisco” by Sophia Steinert, and impactful “Unity” by Hannah Berrett.

We hope you enjoy our selections!

Happy Reading,

Waldon Andrews |The Palouse Review Web editor & Scholarship executive editor

December 1st, 2022


Fiction

Dreamstate
by Noah Hensley (Crafton College Honors Institute)

Noah Hensley is a Computer Science student currently studying at Crafton Hills College. Although a STEM student, he has loved writing ever since he was in elementary school. In addition to writing, he also loves computer programming, hiking, and watching movies.

The Delegation
by Sadie McLaughlin (Western Washington University)

Sadie McLaughlin is a second-year student at Western Washington University. She is interested in psychology, counseling, and writing short fiction.

A Watcher 
by Gillian Ruppel (University of Utah)

Gillian Ruppel is a Sophomore student studying English and Book Arts at the University of Utah. She has been writing both prose and poetry since junior high and plans to continue to pursue this passion in grad school. She specializes in urban fantasy, metaphorical poetry, and literary fiction.

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Nonfiction

Promised
by Laine Bradley (University of Utah)

Laine Bradley is a sophomore at the University of Utah. She is majoring in Kinesiology with an emphasis in emergency medical services. While creative writing has almost nothing to do with her degree or career aspirations, she adores it anyways. When she isn’t riding an ambulance or studying for classes, she can often be found in her natural habitat (under the covers).

Feminine Alignment
by Sadie McLaughlin (Western Washington University)

Sadie McLaughlin is a second-year student at Western Washington University. She is interested in psychology, counseling, and writing short fiction.

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Scholarship

The Tragicomedia of Celestina: Deception as Structural Critique
by Petra Ellerby (Western Washington University)

Petra Ellerby is a fourth-year student at Western Washington University with majors in both History and Humanities. Her research interests lie at the intersection of historiography and political philosophy, with a specific emphasis in the socioeconomic history of the ancient Near East. After graduation, Petra plans to pursue a PhD in the humanities.

Comparison of Dissolved Oxygen and Turbidity in Eelgrass Beds
by Sophie Westermann (Western Washington University)

Sophie Westermann is a first-year student at Western Washington University who transferred with a DTA from Everett Community College through Running Start. She is in the process of applying for an environmental science undergraduate major.

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Poetry

Kitchen
by Laine Bradley (University of Utah)

Laine Bradley is a sophomore at the University of Utah. She is majoring in Kinesiology with an emphasis in emergency medical services. While creative writing has almost nothing to do with her degree or career aspirations, she adores it anyways. When she isn’t riding an ambulance or studying for classes, she can often be found in her natural habitat (under the covers).

My Skin
by Zulaikha Ali (California State University, Fresno)

Zulaikha Ali is a current psychology major in the Smittcamp Family Honors College at Fresno State. She discovered her love for poetry through her culture and Honors Poetry class where she wrote poems and received feedback on them from her peers. She hopes to be able to share her experiences through her poems and find other readers who can relate to them and might have had similar experiences in life.

The Shape I Take
by Elise LeMonnier (University of Utah)

Elise LeMonnier is a current sophomore at the University of Utah. She studies Art History and hopes to one day be a museum curator. Elise likes to read, write, paint, crochet, and be outside.

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Photography and Visual Art

Emma Hippler (University of Portland)

Emma Hippler is a third-year student at the University of Portland double majoring in Political Science and Spanish. Since her early childhood, a variety of her creative outlets have provided healthy modes of self-expression and ways of escaping reality.

Eloïse Schappert (Western Washington University)

Eloïse is a double major in Environmental Science and Art History at Western Washington University. She has a passion for art and observing natural beauty.

Hannah Berrett (University of Utah)

Hannah Berrett is a sophomore at the University of Utah pursuing a Psychology BS and an Applied Positive Psychology Certificate. She is a very hard-working student and in her free time enjoys drawing, playing guitar, working in theater productions, writing, and reading. Hannah has also created her own company HannahEliseCo where she sells hand-painted shoes to customers internationally in order to have a creative outlet whilst being a student.

Sophia Steinert (Irvine Valley College)

Sophia Steinert is a freelance photographer based out of Orange County, California. She specializes in sports, portrait, and travel photography.

Winter Warchol (University of Utah)

Winter enjoys the more beautiful things in life. Music, art, novels, a well-made latte, home cooking, animals, and her friends. She was a river guide last summer in Idaho and absolutely fell in love with the water there. She plans to graduate from the University of Utah this Spring and apply for law school in the coming years (though not right away, sorry mom and dad).

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Illustration of a stalk of wheat